Own The Story

The Lord has taken OneRace and the church in our city on a Journey into His heart on issues of race this year. The major themes on this Journey have centered on knowing, owning and changing the story for future generations. This is part two of a three-part blog series related to those major themes: know the story, own the story & change the story. 

Intercession of the Righteous 

In 2 Chronicles 7:14 God says, “If my people who are called by my name will humble themselves, pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven forgive their sin and heal their land.” This was spoken by God to Solomon at the dedication of the Temple, as a promise to the people of God that in times of trial and judgment, God would show them mercy if they return to Him with all their heart. We see this in the life of Daniel, and in the intercessory prayer he makes on their behalf, however, Daniel was not the only intercessor who stood in the gap on behalf of the nation of Israel during the time of their captivity. Ezekiel the prophet, Nehemiah the builder, and Ezra the priest each played an integral role in both interceding and leading in the restoration of their nation. Each of these men, first, from the place of prayer and lament individually owned the collective sins of their people, though they themselves were righteous. 

Contrition and Confession 

Ezra cried out to God with deep sorrow because of the sins of the returning Israelites. In Ezra 9, he declares, “Still in my torn garment and robe, I fell to my knees with my hands outstretched to the Lord my God, and said, ‘My God, I am too ashamed and hurt to turn to you, because we’re in our iniquities over our heads. Furthermore, my God, our sins have grown as high as the heavens.’”

Nehemiah acknowledged the sins of his nation and asked for the favor of God to return and rebuild Israel, which was in ruins. Nehemiah prayed in Nehemiah 1, “Lord, the God of heaven, the great and awesome God, who keeps his covenant of love with those who love him and keep his commandments, let your ear be attentive and your eyes open to hear the prayer your servant is praying before you day and night for your servants, the people of Israel. I confess the sins we Israelites, including myself and my father’s family, have committed against you.” 

God was attentive to Daniel, Ezra and Nehemiah’s prayers and restored their nation. They were following the prescribed remedy for a diseased and troubled nation that God lays out in Joel 2:12-13, “Now, therefore,” says the Lord, ‘Turn to Me with all your heart, With fasting, with weeping, and with mourning.” So, rend your heart and not your garments, return to the Lord your God, for He is gracious and merciful, slow to anger, and of great kindness; and He relents from doing harm. Who knows if He will turn and relent, and leave a blessing behind Him.”

Collective Responsibility 

We see the power of the intercession of these righteous servants of old when they owned the collective story of their people as their own, and we take to heart that God promises to His church the same restoration when we turn from our sins and turn toward him. James 4:8 tells us, “Draw near to God and He will draw near to you. cleanse your hands you sinners, and purify your hearts you double-minded. Be miserable and mourn and weep; let your laughter be turned into mourning and your joy to gloom. Humble yourselves in the presence of the Lord, and He will lift you up.” Let us pray and ask God to forgive us for our sins, and to lift us up into His presence. 

God is Not White

By Hannah Stevens

It was just another simple exercise to open up the next session of the marriage retreat. The speaker invited us to close our eyes and imagine our Father in Heaven. He told us to open our ears and listen to what the Father might want to say to us. I closed my eyes, entering into the realm of holy imagination, and walked straight into the throne room. I walked confidently, expectantly, like a daughter coming into her daddy’s office knowing he will drop everything to receive her. I looked up into the face of my Father and saw His warm, accepting eyes looking straight at me. But with a shock, I saw that He was richly and beautifully black-skinned.  My confident stride forward halted, fading into shuffling hesitation. My security evaporated into tentative uncertainty. Would I still be received? Did I belong? Did He still want me even though I wasn’t the same color as him? I shyly looked up at Him and I heard Him warmly, richly say, “Welcome to my family.”

The essence of the Gospel is about finding home. We are wired to long for it.  We crave it deeply in our spirits, groaning beyond words. True home is eternity with our Father. But it is more than that. True home is eternity with our family. We are the bruised and battered, sin-riddled, and wounded but each sealed with precious blood. Each of us, dumbfounded and awe-struck, find mercy, acceptance, and welcome from a tender Shepherd who went to unfathomable depths to rescue us from ourselves, for Himself. This family transcends all racial lines, every cultural preference we didn’t even know we had, our pasts, and our family histories.  It doesn’t matter what your dad did. You are welcomed to the table. It doesn’t matter if you’re living paycheck to paycheck. You bring value far beyond what you could ever earn or produce. This is the gospel: belonging in the family of God.

The place where we in Americanized Christianity have gone wrong is in thinking that we can only belong when people look like us, believe like us, and act like us. We cluster in our collective huddles around our pet theologies and doctrines. We say we are open to the broader family of the faith, but how many of us are breaking bread with fellow Christians who fall on the other side of the political spectrum? How many of us are finding rich connection with fellow brothers and sisters on the other side of the tracks? How many of us are “welcoming the stranger” into our homes and our hearts?  

As Christianity has rapidly expanded the last decades, it has touched and is beginning to reach every nation and people group.  A report by Pew Research center from 2010 noted: “Christians are geographically widespread – so far-flung, in fact, that no single continent or region can indisputably claim to be the center of global Christianity.”  Christianity no longer has a geographic center of leadership or a prominent racial majority. This is a truth that we need to understand. There is no center of global Christianity. God’s work is burning through Asia.  It is running through the Middle East. A song is coming up out of Africa. The Americas are hearing of the suffering of so many brethren for the sake of the Gospel in other nations and are starting to realize how much further we have to go.  Christ’s work and His family are stretching across the globe. There is no center. Given these truths, my gentle suggestion is this: let’s get ourselves out of it.

Lord, deliver me from self-centered Christianity, where the preferences of my culture and my particular theological viewpoints are the filter by which I view all other faith expressions. Where my skin color suddenly becomes the color of my God.  Show me I am part of something much bigger than myself. Remind me daily that I am nothing more than the stranger who has found a home. As I have been welcomed, let me welcome others into the rich, gracious, diverse family of God and into the cross that unites us. It’s time to get out of the center and to turn our eyes towards the Man who is the center of it all.

Two weeks ago, I had the honor of attending the Nigerian blessing service of my friends’ newborn daughter. Though we were gathered in a fluorescent-lit, tiny building on the outskirts of Atlanta, I felt like I was in another country.   As the Yoruba hymns rang out, I did my best in my white, bumbling way to sway with the rhythms of the drums. I was uncomfortable and self-conscious. I felt awkward and alone. However, as the sweet baby was publicly valued, honored, welcomed, and blessed, the Holiness of God filled the sanctuary.  I saw the face of my Father in the people gathered. I heard His echo of love as we welcomed the baby into the community. The cultural disparities and our individual differences faded away as the Presence of God sweetly united us. I forgot about being uncomfortable. I forgot about having bad rhythm. In that moment, as a community, we entered into the Presence of Christ, who is and always will be the true center of our faith. Sitting there, in the presence of God together, we tasted the home that is to still to come, the home that awaits us.